Christina Wallace

Founder and CEO of Quincy

2005 Alumni

Biography

Theater Studies and Mathematics, 2005, Summa cum laude
New York, NY
MBA Harvard Business School (Boston, 08-10)
Founder and CEO, Quincy www.quincyapparel.com

 

Since Emory

Rosemary Magee Arts Associate at Schwartz Center / Freelance director and musician in Atlanta (05-06)

Arts Management at the Metropolitan Opera (New York, 06-08)

MBA Harvard Business School (Boston, 08-10)

Management Consulting with the Boston Consulting Group (DC, 10-11)

Essay on Business and the Arts published in "Passion and Purpose" by Harvard Business Press in 2011

Founder and CEO, Quincy (www.quincyapparel.com) (New York, 2011-present) Founded 2011, launched 2012. Recently raised ~$1MM in funding from Venture Capital firms and angel investors. Team of 14 and growing.

Current activities

Currently sing with the New York Choral Society and am Managing Director of Crook Theater Company (volunteer, part-time position; company founded by 2003 Emory TS alum Raife Baker). Running NYC Triathlon (Olympic distance) and NYC Marathon this year. Guest blog for Women 2.0, Daily Muse, and Forbes.com. Blog regularly at www.christinamwallace.com.

Highlights at Emory

Directing You're A Good Man Charlie Brown for Ad Hoc and Three Days of Rain for my honors thesis production. I met Steph Bruno when I cast her as Sally in YAGMCB; she became my little sister in ADPi; I was at her wedding when she became Stephanie Castro; she was an early volunteer as Quincy's first blogger; her actual little sister Lia is now one of my summer interns.  

Assistant Directing Leap with Megan Monaghan, written by Lauren Gunderson – two amazing women I keep in close touch with today. (I sang at Megan's wedding.  Lauren was one of Quincy's first customers.)  

Working hard to encourage interdisciplinary work while President of Ad Hoc and continuing that work after graduation as the Arts Intern at Schwartz. 

Establishing friendships with professors that continue to this day – Michael Evenden, Pat Miller, Vinnie Murphy. So so worth it. 

In retrospect

My public speaking skills were developed entirely through acting classes and performances. Same goes for my sales ability and networking skills. My ability to be scrappy and hustle and make something with practically nothing (and no time) was honed through student theater.  My knowledge of the usage of "that" vs. "which" is entirely due to Michael Evenden. My coffee-making skills are due to Robert Schultz, as is my love of lists and spreadsheets and reminder emails. I actually wrote a blog post on how my theater degree was the best preparation for entrepreneurship, bar none.  http://blog.christinamwallace.com/2011/10/20/why-study-theater-a-defense-of-the-liberal-arts/ And the Emory friends that remain in my life nearly a decade later are my sorority sisters and my theater friends. I think that says everything.

And …

I've become a bit of an adventure junkie. Since graduating: I've traveled solo to 20 countries; climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro; practiced yoga at sunset on Machu Picchu; learned to ski; and went volcano boarding down an active volcano in Nicaragua in a thunderstorm.