Christie Pettitt-Schieber

MPH candidate

UNC-Chapel Hill

2009 Alumni

Biography


Chapel Hill, North Carolina
MPH Candidate, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

What have you been up to since graduation?

I interned at Actors Theatre of Louisville as their Festival Intern for the Humana Festival of New American Plays; I worked at Apple for two years as an Associate in their Apple Store Leader Program; I was the executive director of the Ashraya Initiative for Children in Pune, India; I worked as a tutor for MacTutor in Chicago; and I was a development coordinator at Rotary International in The Rotary Foundation. 

What are you current ivolved with?

I am now starting an MPH program at UNC-Chapel Hill, focusing on leadership, policy and global health. 

What are some of your favorite memories from Emory?

One of my favorite memories was selling out every show of FOR COLORED GIRLS... with AHANA Theater, including one show in which we had to delay the start because the BRB theater air conditioning wasn't working and it was blazing hot with a full house. I also enjoyed that the MGM was perpetually my home, even if I didn't have a class or wasn't working on a show at the time. APO initiation was also a blast. Lastly, being awarded The Golden Screw at my senior year Furrie Curries was definitely a highlight.

What advice do you have for current theater students?

Focus on the relationships you are building, the people you are working with, and who you are surrounding yourself with. You will always have these people in your life if you want them; theater kids, especially at Emory, are just like that.

More specifically:

1. If you need Michael Evenden's attention, do not be afraid to sit outside his office door until he emerges. And do not question your gut; his feedback on your paper, his perspective on your career trajectory, and his mentorship in general IS worth the wait.

2. Be proud of your degree. You may not be the most lauded of students since you're not an NBB or B-school major, but you will work just as hard. THEA 410 is nothing to sniff at.

3. Do an honors thesis if you really want to. But if you don't really want to, don't do one.

4. Make yourself go to the cool things and people Emory brings to campus. I regret the speakers I didn't see when I had the opportunity to see them for free just doors away from me.

5. Be open to where a theater degree will take you. Dive into your experience, get everything you can out of it, and then see if it leads you to a career in theater or sets you up for success in some entirely different career. Either way, theater students have the best set of skills money can buy: comfort with ambiguity and uncertainty, confidence to “fake it ’til you make it,” creative energy, a desire to collaborate, and a yearning to find the meaning in life.